Brass French Press

Brass French Press

Brass french press Our company specializes in producing French press.A cylindrical pot with a plunger and built-in filter screen that presses hot water through ground coffee: that’s the simple beauty of the French press, method of choice for many the world over, creating an earthy, rich taste in the cup.

Product Details

Brass french press

Our company specializes in producing French press.A cylindrical pot with a plunger and built-in filter screen that presses hot water through ground coffee: that’s the simple beauty of the French press, method of choice for many the world over, creating an earthy, rich taste in the cup.

 

1.Product Introduction of the French Press

The french coffee press is made by heat resistant borosilicate glass,resisting high temperature more than 200 degree.Advanced technics makes the products beautiful and practical and durable, strong.Eco-friendly, non-poisonous, all kinds styles.

 

2. Product Introduction of the French Press

Model NO.: 

WY-S520

Type:

Coffee Maker&Tea Maker

Style:

French Press

Processlng Material: 

Coffee Powder&Tea

Material:

Stainless Steel + Glass

Package:

One PC/Bag/White Box

Main Keyword:

French Press

Specification: 

350ml;600ml;800ml;1000ml

Capacity:

1~10 Cups

Usage:

Home Use,Commercial

Color:

Natural+Brass

Origin:

China

HS Code:

7013490000

 

3.Product Feature And Application of the French Press
Over the years, the French press has undergone several design modifications. The first coffee press, which may have been made in France, was the modern coffee press in its rudimentary form—a metal or cheesecloth screen fitted to a rod that users would press into a pot of boiling water. The coffee press was patented by Milanese designer Attilio Calimani in 1929. It underwent several design modifications through Faliero Bondanini, who patented his own version in 1958 and began manufacturing it in a French clarinet factory called Martin SA under the brand name "Melior".[2] Its popularity may have been aided in 1965 by its use in the Michael Caine film The Ipcress File. The device was further popularized across Europe by a British company by the name of Household Articles Ltd. and the Danish tableware and kitchenware company Bodum.

The modern French press consists of a narrow cylindrical beaker, usually made of glass or clear plastic, equipped with a metal or plastic lid and plunger that fits tightly in the cylinder and has a fine stainless steel wire or nylon mesh filter.

 

 

4. Production Details of the French Press


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5. Introduction of factory production and packaging


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6.French Press Usage method

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7.Coffee is brewed by placing coarsely ground coffee in the empty beaker and adding hot—between 93–96 °C (199–205 °F)—water, in proportions of about 30 g (1.1 oz) of coffee grounds to 500 ml (17 US fl oz) of water, more or less to taste. The brewing time is about two to four minutes. Then the mesh plunger or piston is pressed, to separate the grounds and hold them at the bottom of the beaker. The mesh piston normally does not compress the coffee grounds, as most designs leave a generous space—about 30 mm (1.2 in)—below the piston in its lowest position. If the brewed coffee is allowed to remain in the beaker with the used grounds, the coffee may become astringent and bitter, though this is an effect that some users of the French press consider desirable.

A French press works best with coffee of a coarser grind than does a drip brew coffee filter, about the consistency of kosher salt.[3]Finer grounds, when immersed in water, have lower permeability, requiring an excessive amount of force to be applied by hand to lower the plunger and are more likely to seep through or around the perimeter of the press filter and into the coffee.[4] Additionally, finer grounds will tend to over-extract and cause the coffee to taste bitter.[3]

It is believed that the optimum time for brewing the coffee is around four minutes, and some consider the coffee spoiled after about 20 minutes.[5] Other approaches, such as cold-brewing, require several hours of contact between the water and the grounds to achieve the desired extraction.

 


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